Study: Obesity costly to airlines

By Associated Press |
Friday, November 5, 2004

ATLANTA -- Heavy suitcases aren't the only things weighing down airplanes and requiring them to burn more fuel, pushing up the cost of flights. A new government study reveals that airlines increasingly have to worry more about the weight of their passengers.

America's growing waistlines are hurting the bottom lines of airline companies as the extra pounds on passengers are causing a drag on planes. Heavier fliers have created heftier fuel costs, according to the government study.

Through the 1990s, the average weight of Americans increased by 10 pounds, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The extra weight caused airlines to spend $275 million to burn 350 million more gallons of fuel in 2000 just to carry the additional weight of Americans, the federal agency estimated in a recent issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

The extra fuel burned also had an environmental impact, as an estimated 3.8 million extra tons of carbon dioxide were released into the air, according to the study.

 

 

Financial News


 

Great Mortgage Articles:
Homeowner's Insurance | Debt Overload | Credit Cards | Successful Remodeling | Managing Mortgages | Refinancing Loans | Home Improvement | Moving Tips | Homeownership Mishaps | Best Appraisals | Clean Your Credit | Real Estate Investments

Apply Online | About Us | Contact Us | Free Mortgage Quotes | Our Programs | Home Equity Loans
Second Mortgages | Refinance Mortgage | FAQ

Home Equity Loans